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Pet Care Information

 


 

Quality Diets and Pet Nutrition

We are what we eat so the best quality food will give the best results. We stock a large range of imported and locally made foods for pets of all shapes and sizes and for all sorts of special requirements such as sensitive stomachs, hair ball formulas, sensitive itchy skins etc.

Specialised Nutrition and Prescription Diets

Specific diets can be of enormous help in managing some medical conditions eg Kidney & liver problems. These specific diets are perfectly balanced to help the body deal with the condition being treated

 

Vaccinationsnutrision

Vaccinating our pets is the best way to prevent some common and often fatal diseases of dogs and cats. A vaccination stimulates the immune system to react fast and effectively when an animal gets exposed to that particular disease. Common diseases in dogs that we vaccinate against are parvovirus , kennel cough , infectious hepatitis , distemper and rabies. Common diseases in cats that we vaccinate against are feline panleukopaenia virus, snuffles, and rabies. We use the following vaccination time protocols in our practice.

Dogs are vaccinated at 6 weeks, 9/10 weeks, 12/14 weeks and then annually for the 5 in 1 vaccine – for rabies at 14 weeks, 20 weeks and then every year.

Cats are vaccinated at 9 weeks, 13 weeks, and annually for the 3 in 1 – for rabies at 13 weeks, 17 weeks and then every three years.

We will send a reminder by post or by SMS to you when your pet is due for their check up and vaccination.

The annual visit for the vaccination also gives us an opportunity to do a thorough clinical examination on your pet which enables us to recognise diseases early, for example heart disease.
This means we can treat your pet earlier for the specific condition, and often have better results.

 

Deworming

vacination

Worms are very commonly found in dogs and cats in South Africa and can be a major source of disease and debility in our pets and can be fatal especially to young animals.
More over some worms can be transmitted to humans and cause severe problems. The close contact between our pets and ourselves means we must deworm our pets regularly with approved broad-spectrum medication that will kill round worms and tape worms. The frequency of deworming depends on many factors including age and region.

Please speak to one of our vets for more advice.

 

Weight and obesity

Weight problems in our pets are common and cause the same problems as with ourselves. Heat intolerance, stiffness, diabetes and heart disease are just some of the commonly encountered conditions. Reduced calorie foods are available to help pets lose weight safely and we have a weighing scale in our waiting room to monitor results. The difference in our pets lifestyle and activity once the have lost weight is astounding. Trained nutritional advisors are available to assist. We now have a weight clinic where we use a computer model to calculate calorific requirements accurately show results on a graph as we go along.

 

Arthritis

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Osteoarthritis is one of the most common debilitating diseases affecting dogs. 1 in 5 adult dogs shows signs. Often these signs are not recognised as pain by the owners and are attributed to “getting older.” We only appreciate that our friends are in pain when we give them pain killers and we see the improvement. Modern anti-inflammatories and nutraceuticals can have a significant effect on chronic pain, and can change lives. Cats are also commonly affected by arthritis but this often goes unrecognised as they dont show evidence of pain and stiffness. Treatments and diets are now readily available to help them also.

 

Lumps and Bumps

Lumps and growths are common in dogs and cats particularly as they get older. Owners are often too scared to have them checked out in case they are bad news. Not all lumps are cancerous - many are benign and can be easily, safely and permanently removed. Don`t leave them to grow large because then removal is very much more difficult and the lumps` character may change to make them more dangerous

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Bones: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Bones

Although most of us grew up with the assumption that bones are good for our pets this is in fact a fallacy, one that more pet owners should be made aware of.  Let’s look at some effects and risks involved when feeding bones to pets.

The Good:

The unfortunate truth is that the only good thing about feeding your dog bones is that they like it and it keeps them busy, especially if they have a tendency to chew. Sadly just as we all enjoy our McDonalds, KFC and pizza we know these foods are not good for our health and the same applies to bones for your dog. They carry no nutritional value and are indigestible. Perhaps the only part of the bone a dog may actually eat and digest would be bone marrow.



My cat has pimples!

Feline Acne

Feline acne is a common skin condition in cats. Cats of any age can be affected, and there is no breed or sex predisposition.

Cats are often presented to the veterinarian with the complaint of ‘dirt on the cat’s chin, that the owner cannot remove after attempts to clean it’ or ‘bumps on the cats chin’.

How does feline acne develop?

Hair follicles on the chin become blocked with secretions from small fat glands called sebaceous glands in the skin. This gives rise to multiple blackheads otherwise known as comedones on the chin, giving the chin the so-called ‘dirty appearance’. These comedones may also be associated with small red blisters or pimples and crusts on the surface of the chin.



What is trichobezoar?

Hairballs in cats

The elusive and very unpleasant hairball is something that every cat owner will experience at some point. Cats in general are very clean and well-kept animals and grooming is an essential routine for them to ensure their cleanliness. A healthy cat is one that grooms.  Hairballs are simply a by-product of your cat’s hygiene.

A trichobezoar, commonly known as a hairball, is a clump of indigestible hair, moistened by bile and digestive fluid that may or may not contain bits of food or other foreign material. Hairballs are not usually round in shape but rather drawn-out and the shape of a sausage. This is due to their passage through the oesophagus, the tube connecting the stomach to the mouth, which is long and cylindrical. Hairballs can occasionally resemble faeces but on closer examination one will notice it is made up of hair. It also does not smell like faeces although it does not have a particularly pleasant odour.



What causes back pain in dogs?

Disc disease in dogs

Introduction

Intervertebral disc disease is a term that describes the condition in which the softer cartilage like material in between the bones of the spine, called an intervertebral disc, pushes onto the spinal cord, causing clinical signs that varies from slight back pain and discomfort to complete paralysis of limbs. Even with the slightest clinical signs, your pet should be examined by the vet to establish how serious the condition is and be treated accordingly. The earlier this is attended to, the better the overall outcome. 



Is your male pet missing testicles?

Cryptorchidism

Cryptorchidism is a condition where the male dog or cat’s testicles have not descended into the scrotum. Descended in this context means that the testicles has come from inside the dog or cat’s belly and are visibly sitting in the ball sack (scrotum).

In the embryo, when the kitten or puppy is being formed in the mother’s womb, the testicles develop inside the puppy or kitten’s abdomen (stomach cavity) behind the kidneys. As the embryo matures, the testicles then move from the inside to the outside of the animal’s abdomen.



Old man's gland - Do dogs have the same problems as humans?

Prostate disease in the dog

The prostate is the only accessory sex gland in the male dog. It is a butterfly shaped structure that surrounds the urethra (the tube that connects the bladder to the outside). Due to the location of the prostate, it can affect the urinary system, the colon and the hind legs, as well as having some systemic effects. Prostatic fluid is produced continuously in the dog. Prostatic fluid makes up most of the volume of seminal fluid (the fluid that carries semen). The prostate has many nerves and blood vessels running to it but is surrounded by a thick capsule, which sometimes makes it difficult for some drugs to get deep down into the prostate. Normal prostatic function is dependent on circulating testosterone. The prostate can develop a few conditions that can result in debilitating disease in the dog.



Can I treat my pet's wound at home?

Wound Care at Home

When managing wounds at home it is important to always contact your veterinarian for assistance. Many home and even human wound remedies are not suitable for use in pets. Determining factors in deciding whether a wound can be treated at home or needs veterinary care includes the severity and age of the wound, the cause and location of the wound, and most importantly if the pet is leaving the wound alone. In most instances the safest and most effective way to deal with it is to take the injured pet to the veterinarian for initial treatment and advice on continued care at home. In this article we will go over some of the major components of wound treatment and care as well as giving you guidelines on when to visit the vet.



Pregnant women have to watch out for this bug carried by cats

Toxoplasmosis

Introduction

Toxoplasma gondii is a tiny organism, slightly bigger than a bacterium, called a protozoa. This parasite has a worldwide distribution, except in the absence of cats. Cats are the only animals capable of completing the life cycle of this organism. Other warm blooded animals, including cats can serve as intermediate hosts for the parasite. The organism has a very high prevalence, but rarely causes clinical disease in dogs and cats. This is an important parasite to be aware of due to the fact that it is an important zoonosis, meaning it is an animal disease that can be transmitted to humans.



Why is my dog limping with his hind leg?

Patellar Luxation

Patellar luxation is a condition where the knee cap does not run in its groove but slips off to the side. Luxation is a learned word for “slipping”. It is a condition which is regularly encountered in dogs and more commonly in toy breeds. The condition can be developmental or traumatic in origin.

To understand the condition better, it helps to know what the anatomy of the knee looks like. The patella is commonly known as the knee cap and sits at the bottom of the big muscle group of the upper front part of the hind leg called the quadriceps. The patella makes up the front part of the knee and glides in the middle groove of the big bone of the upper part of the hind leg, the femur. This groove is known as the trochlear groove. The groove looks like a valley with two mountain ridges on either side. The ridges on either side of the groove are known as the trochlear ridges. The ridge on the inner part of the leg is known as the medial trochlear ridge and the one on the outer part is known as the lateral trochlear ridge. The knee cap or patella fits nicely in between these two ridges and glides up and down the groove as the knee bends. The patella is stabilised by the big muscle group to the top of it, the strong ligament to the bottom of it and the ligaments and connective tissue to the sides of it. The patella ligament which sits below the patella, implants onto the front of the top part of the bone underneath the femur, the tibia, also known as the shin bone.  



My young cat seems ill

Feline Infectious Peritonitis

Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a serious and most often fatal disease affecting cats. It is most commonly seen in young cats between the ages of six months and two years. It has been found to affect male cats more commonly than females and purebred cats particularly the Asian breeds are more susceptible. It is characterised by fluid build-up in body cavities such as the chest and abdomen and neurological signs. It can affect all major organs and inevitably results in death. It may be referred to as Feline coronavirus polyserositis (wet or effusive form) or granulomatous feline infectious peritonitis (dry or non effusive form).



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